Staff Picks And Reviews
Hedy Reviews “Garbology”

Hedy Reviews “Garbology”

By Library Staff May 29, 2015

Garbology: “the study of a community or culture by studying its waste”. Having been stuck for 24 hours in the Atlanta airport recently, my husband and I were on the verge of finally purchasing a cell phone. It’s so hard to find pay phones these days. But I was reading “Garbology” at the time and cell phones make up the biggest category of e-waste by far, so we’re still holding off and exercising our wits and powers of planning ahead instead. It’s more challenging every year.

Hedy Reviews “Blackman’s Coffin”

Hedy Reviews “Blackman’s Coffin”

By Library Staff May 14, 2015

Sam Blackman was a Chief Warrant Officer in the Criminal Investigation Detachment of the U.S. Military when he lost his leg in Iraq. He was moved from Washington, D.C., to a hospital in Asheville, North Carolina, because he was complaining too much about facilities and treatment. There he meets an ex-marine and fellow amputee who points him in a new direction–until she’s murdered.

Hedy Reviews “The Big House”

Hedy Reviews “The Big House”

By Library Staff May 5, 2015

Colt doesn’t shy away from the mental illness, despair, and alcoholism present at times in the Big House, but all in all, it’s a “love letter to the past”. Colt said in an interview, “The book is about loss, but it’s also about change. My family’s always been reluctant to change, but now we’ve found out everybody is stronger and more resilient as a result.”

Hedy Reviews “The Forest Unseen”

Hedy Reviews “The Forest Unseen”

By Library Staff April 30, 2015

Haskell is a professor of biology at the University of the South. He undertook the project of quietly visiting one square meter of ground in an old growth forest in Tennessee almost daily for a year. He spent hours at a time letting all his senses experience what was there in what he called the “mandala”, a Sanskrit word for “community”. What’s so marvelous about his book is that he took particularities of time and place and made them universal. When a deer came within inches of him from behind, he wrote a chapter about the importance of large herbivores doing what we currently call “overbrowsing” the forest.

Hedy Reviews “No Such Country”

Hedy Reviews “No Such Country”

By Library Staff April 28, 2015

I first learned about this book from John Price who undertook a literary residency for the Scott County Reads Together program several years ago. He and Elmar Lueth both attended graduate writing programs at the University of Iowa and became very good friends. On Price’s recommendation alone, I purchased the book for the Library’s collection and then promoted it to the German American Heritage Center Book Group. Lueth grew up in Germany, but spent many years in the United States, most of it in Iowa where he met his future wife.

Hedy Reviews “My Name is Mary Sutter”

Hedy Reviews “My Name is Mary Sutter”

By Library Staff April 20, 2015

Mary Sutter is a skilled midwife, but dreams of being a surgeon. There is a prejudice against women in medicine, but when the Civil War starts being waged, Mary finds her desire and ability to help in great demand, regardless of her gender. The author is a trained nurse, and her descriptions of complicated labors and births, the amputations of legs, and the consequences of battle injuries and diseases are detailed and realistic. Her language borders at times on quaint in that readers feel like they’re in that time and place. And for those with a romantic bent, there’s that too.